FLORENCE HOWE

activist, writer, and founder of the Feminist Press




Florence in Words

Jeannette Petras, Creativity in Action

August 23, 2011

Tags: Jeannette, Kennedy, Feminist Press

When I first met Jeannette Petras in 2005, I was temporarily the director/publisher and she was working part-time at the Feminist Press, a tall, slim, attractive twenty-something, who spoke with calm energy about what marketing was possible in three days a week. I liked her readiness for laughter as much as I liked her firm sense of order. Between 2004 and 2010, she became the marketing manager at the Feminist Press, directing two junior staff members plus a raft of interns. She was responsible for marketing, sales, inventory (which included paying attention to fast-moving books for reordering), and attending to the website, that ever-growing, hydra-like realm that replaced mass mailings and advertising. For quarterly Board meetings, she produced detailed sales reports that illuminated the kinds of markets books were reaching. Several times during the six years, she was offered jobs that would have paid her far more than she could earn at a non-profit. But she cared about our mission, she said, and felt rewarded by the importance of the books themselves. (more…)

Blog Miscellany

June 20, 2011

Tags: theatre, Jeannette, Betty Friedan, Alida Brill

I apologize to my blog-readers for silence, which has two causes: laziness about writing blogs and the absence of dear Jeannette, who is off at a seminar for much of June. For those of you just tuning in, this website depends on the skills of Jeannette Petras, who used to be the Feminist Press's brilliant marketing manager, and would that she was still there marketing my book. But that’s another story. (more…)

Select Works

"Everyone concerned about global feminism, women’s contributions, and humanity’s future will be enhanced and enchanted by A Life in Motion.”—Blanche Wiesen Cook, author of Eleanor Roosevelt: Volume I and Volume II
Lecture delivered by Florence Howe on January 8, 2011, at the Modern Language Association Annual Convention
“It is impossible to imagine women’s studies without Florence Howe. Myths of Coeducation shows her vision and courage, insight and dauntlessness.”–Catharine R. Stimpson, Rutgers University
A revised and expanded edition of the classic groundbreaking anthology of 20th-century American women's poetry, representing more than 100 poets from Amy Lowell to Anne Sexton to Rita Dove.

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