FLORENCE HOWE

activist, writer, and founder of the Feminist Press




Florence in Words

Dorothy Sayers, Part Two

August 12, 2011

Tags: Dorothy Sayers, Virginia Woolf

So here I am weeks later wondering why I decided to write a blog about Dorothy Sayers in the first place. I think it was the revelation in the biography I happened to find on my bookshelf among the eleven novels: that Sayers had had a child out of wedlock whom she gave to her cousin to rear, without telling her about its parentage. Indeed, the son died without knowing his father. Anyone who has read my memoir will understand my interest, no, my fascination with anyone who could bear a child and then bear to deny motherhood for the child and for herself. As it happened, the young man—we hear from in the volume—seems to have grown into a sensible person, able to understand Sayers’ dilemmas and forgive her. (more…)

Why Dorothy Sayers?

July 18, 2011

Tags: family, Dorothy Sayers

I first began to read mysteries as a substitute for scotch which I was using to survive 12-hour days with my mother. Each evening at about seven, I’d flee from the Palm Beach nursing home to the nearest bar and drink two scotches in succession, giving myself a splitting headache and a reason to go to bed at once. So I’d drive the few blocks to my motel, and fall asleep in my clothes, only to wake in the middle of the night, head aching still, and in need of food. (more…)

Select Works

"Everyone concerned about global feminism, women’s contributions, and humanity’s future will be enhanced and enchanted by A Life in Motion.”—Blanche Wiesen Cook, author of Eleanor Roosevelt: Volume I and Volume II
Lecture delivered by Florence Howe on January 8, 2011, at the Modern Language Association Annual Convention
“It is impossible to imagine women’s studies without Florence Howe. Myths of Coeducation shows her vision and courage, insight and dauntlessness.”–Catharine R. Stimpson, Rutgers University
A revised and expanded edition of the classic groundbreaking anthology of 20th-century American women's poetry, representing more than 100 poets from Amy Lowell to Anne Sexton to Rita Dove.

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